Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Poor Man's Stain Glass Art aka Broken Glass Mosaic DIY

Broken Glass Mosaic Tutorial

Materials:

  • assorted clear and colored glass pieces
  • flatten glass marbles, sea glass - optional
  • Modge Podge or any other adhesive that dries clear
  • old brush
  • wood frame (I used a barn wood frame) 
  • glass cover that fits in the picture frame - will become the 'base' on which the glass pieces are glued
  • gloves to protect you from cuts
  • eye screws 
  • old wire hanger 

1.   I used the E6000 adhesive in the silver tube pictured above (can be bought at craft stores) to glue the glass cover to the frame.  Let dry until secure. This glass will now become your base to glue the glass pieces on. 

2. Gather your glass pieces.  I recommend cleaning or rinsing the glass cover and glass pieces first.  I did my first frame outside and ended up with specs of dirt in the glue.  
~ Your repurposed glass pieces can come from old wine bottles, vases, drinking glasses, jars etc.  I tried to find different textures, colors, and shapes to make it interesting.  The smaller 'accent pieces' can come from bought flattened marbles or sea glass.  I even found some transparent little buttons at the thrift store I want to use on the next one. I like adding some extra pop of color.  It is not really necessary to buy any thing, though- once you start looking you will likely find tons of stuff at home.~

 Supplies


 Barn Wood frame with glass- disregard the wire hanger.  That will be removed. 

 Glass Accent pieces

 My broken glass collection

 3.  You can break the glass safely by wrapping the jar, bottle etc. in an old towel and gently hitting it with a small hammer.  You can also wear thin gardening gloves so you don't cut yourself.  Be sure to throw the small glass shards away so you don't step on them!


4.  Brush Mod Podge, Elmer's glue or any other glue that dries clear on to glass base.  I used an old bristle brush because I like the texture it adds.  Layer it on thick.  Arrange your pieces on the glass base.  I used E6000 to anchor the larger pieces to the base.  Because the edges are irregular you may need to layer the pieces a bit and glue pieces not only to the base but other glass pieces.  Overlapping adds interest.  The more densely colored accents pieces add some pop.  This mosaic will be very dimensional.... at least mine were... don't be afraid to use the curved bottoms of glasses, jars etc. I even have a portion of a glass tea cup in one of my broken glass mosaics.





5.  Allow to dry.  Test for loose pieces that need re-anchored.

I had planned on adding a layer of resin once the glass pieces were firmly anchored and dry, but found it was not really necessary.  I had some 'open' spaces in once of my frames were a couple larger glass pieces came loose.  I left the space open because the brush strokes from the 1st layer of Mod Podge looked nice.
Mod Podge Layer 


6. Screw in Eye Screws.  I am sharing the photo of this sign I made with eye screws and an old wire clothes hanger shaped to be a decorative hanger.  The broken glass mosaics look best hung with light shining thru them.





Wire Clothes Hanger - Hanger! 





Finished Product ~~ minus the eye screws and hanger!  Need to do that!  :)



The photos don't capture these well so if you like this, you will love them in person!


My art studio space.  In addition to painting, I love working with repurposed items.  
My husband is a wood turner and my son likes to do wood working so there should be more along this same line coming soon. 
You can read here how I got some of my materials.
http://amulti-coloredlife.blogspot.com/2016/04/a-repurposed-upcycled-salvaged-me.html

My etsy shop has some repurposed, vintage pieces for sale in addition to paintings and pet portraits.  I always appreciate the likes and sharing!  :)

 Thanks for stopping by!  
I would love to see what you do, so come back and share in the comments!  


happy trails!

Sue Steiner


Poor Man's Stain Glass Art aka Broken Glass Mosaic DIY

Broken Glass Mosaic Tutorial

Materials:

  • assorted clear and colored glass pieces
  • flatten glass marbles, sea glass - optional
  • Modge Podge or any other adhesive that dries clear
  • old brush
  • wood frame (I used a barn wood frame) 
  • glass cover that fits in the picture frame - will become the 'base' on which the glass pieces are glued
  • gloves to protect you from cuts
  • eye screws 
  • old wire hanger 

1.   I used the E6000 adhesive in the silver tube pictured above (can be bought at craft stores) to glue the glass cover to the frame.  Let dry until secure. This glass will now become your base to glue the glass pieces on. 

2. Gather your glass pieces.  I recommend cleaning or rinsing the glass cover and glass pieces first.  I did my first frame outside and ended up with specs of dirt in the glue.  
~ Your repurposed glass pieces can come from old wine bottles, vases, drinking glasses, jars etc.  I tried to find different textures, colors, and shapes to make it interesting.  The smaller 'accent pieces' can come from bought flattened marbles or sea glass.  I even found some transparent little buttons at the thrift store I want to use on the next one. I like adding some extra pop of color.  It is not really necessary to buy any thing, though- once you start looking you will likely find tons of stuff at home.~

 Supplies


 Barn Wood frame with glass- disregard the wire hanger.  That will be removed. 

 Glass Accent pieces

 My broken glass collection

 3.  You can break the glass safely by wrapping the jar, bottle etc. in an old towel and gently hitting it with a small hammer.  You can also wear thin gardening gloves so you don't cut yourself.  Be sure to throw the small glass shards away so you don't step on them!


4.  Brush Mod Podge, Elmer's glue or any other glue that dries clear on to glass base.  I used an old bristle brush because I like the texture it adds.  Layer it on thick.  Arrange your pieces on the glass base.  I used E6000 to anchor the larger pieces to the base.  Because the edges are irregular you may need to layer the pieces a bit and glue pieces not only to the base but other glass pieces.  Overlapping adds interest.  The more densely colored accents pieces add some pop.  This mosaic will be very dimensional.... at least mine were... don't be afraid to use the curved bottoms of glasses, jars etc. I even have a portion of a glass tea cup in one of my broken glass mosaics.





5.  Allow to dry.  Test for loose pieces that need re-anchored.

I had planned on adding a layer of resin once the glass pieces were firmly anchored and dry, but found it was not really necessary.  I had some 'open' spaces in once of my frames were a couple larger glass pieces came loose.  I left the space open because the brush strokes from the 1st layer of Mod Podge looked nice.
Mod Podge Layer 


6. Screw in Eye Screws.  I am sharing the photo of this sign I made with eye screws and an old wire clothes hanger shaped to be a decorative hanger.  The broken glass mosaics look best hung with light shining thru them.





Wire Clothes Hanger - Hanger! 





Finished Product ~~ minus the eye screws and hanger!  Need to do that!  :)



The photos don't capture these well so if you like this, you will love them in person!


My art studio space.  In addition to painting, I love working with repurposed items.  
My husband is a wood turner and my son likes to do wood working so there should be more along this same line coming soon. 
You can read here how I got some of my materials.
http://amulti-coloredlife.blogspot.com/2016/04/a-repurposed-upcycled-salvaged-me.html

My etsy shop has some repurposed, vintage pieces for sale in addition to paintings and pet portraits.  I always appreciate the likes and sharing!  :)

 Thanks for stopping by!  
I would love to see what you do, so come back and share in the comments!  


happy trails!

Sue Steiner


Friday, June 24, 2016

Life After a Creative Block



Thank goodness my muse came back!!   Have you ever suffered a creative block?  I suppose it is not hard to see how blocks come about.  Life happens.  Work obligations, family demands, and life events can throw the sometimes precarious creative process off kilter and put your creating time into a tailspin.  Please don't despair.  I am writing this to remind you it will come back.

This may not be a magic formula to get you get back creating if this has happened to you but I can offer a few tips that were helpful to me.


  • Start small- just dibble-dabble when you can.  No pressure, no demands, no deadlines, no agendas other than to just dabble for the heck of it.  
  • Don't force it.  If life has really thrown you a curve ball it's okay to take some time off from creating if your heart is heavy due to other things.  
  • Try other art mediums or creative outlets.  If you are a painter but blocked, take photographs.  Try your hand at something new and different.  Don't put pressure on yourself to do this new activity well-- allow yourself to just play and get the feel for something different.
  • Follow your heart- is there something in particular always makes you happy?  Pay attention to that.  Indulge your inner child- let her play! 
  • Try to avoid extremes in your thinking.  Just because you are not creating now does not mean you won't ever again.  Think of this as a normal ebb and flow of creating.  In my mind, once a person is an 'artist' they are always an artist.  Being artistic and/or creative is the way in which you view the world and not dependant on what you create.  Your creations are a by product or off-shoot of your creative thinking.  

There is an upside to creative blocks.  I spend my non-creating time focusing on non-art related college courses.  I developed some new skills, challenged myself *, and worked full time in a field other than art.  


Things I appreciate more since my creative block;
  • I am proud of the courses I took and the things I learned.  I worked hard doing things that don't come as easily to me as art.  I think of myself as a bit more well rounded.  
  • I appreciate my art for how it makes me feel.  
  • I see now what a great stress reliever it is for me.  
  • I feel art is integral to who I am regardless of what I produce.  
  • I came back to my art a bit more settled and less scattered.  It was like sitting down to a good meal that you want to savor.  I tend to paint fast-- which is fine since that is kind of my style but I seem to have a bit more discretion as to what I do with my art.  I believe I am getting the foundation right before jumping right in.  Before I was like a kid in a candy store-- I wanted to get right to the painting part with full gusto.  Some of my more spontaneous were my favorites but before my block, I couldn't slow down as I can now so I had trouble slowing down when I wanted to do more detailed work.  Maybe I got my left brain to kick in a bit more now!  Maybe the downtime for creating art allowed me to become a bit more integrated?  If so that is a very good thing.  

If you find yourself in a similar boat that I was in and are experiencing a creative block let me say this.... it will work itself out.  Take some deep breaths and relax.  The wonderful thing about our artistic and creative minds is although this may outwardly look like non-productive time, it can very well be a time for growth in areas you couldn't imagine before.  And your art will be there, like a fine meal you can savor when the time is right!  

Best wishes to you!  

Sue Steiner

*  Studying 'data analysis' will make you crave art- I guarantee!  

Sunday, April 17, 2016

A Repurposed, Upcycled, Salvaged Me

repurposed art, signs and furniture


Is it just me or does everyone turn projects into a reflection of themselves?  Or is that just the nature of creating?  As I sat down to write this blog post and I began to think of the title it occurred to me that I, in fact, feel the words: repurposed, upcycled and salvaged describe me.   I am a bit worn and weathered, have been thru some major transitions, maybe have left out to dry at times but feel like I am on the upside of things.  Plus, I certainly feel repurposed with 2 grandbabies!

We have had a piece of land beside us with stacks and piles of various wood buildings, wood boards, clay drainage tiles, metal barn siding and other odds and ends.  Thank goodness for trees that kept it all fairly hidden and not an eye sore.  The old man that owned it passed away several years ago and it has changed hands.  Recently the stacks are being removed and buildings were torn down.  It has left me with a wealth of salvaged materials.

My adult son has taken an interest in using these materials to make some 'live edge' and repurposed wood furniture, shelves, clocks and whatever else we can come up imagine.  I have been tinkering for a while with salvaged materials such as barn roof slate, old tin, old horseshoes, wire etc. so we are going to go on an adventure together!  I will continue dabbling in making signs, painting slates, twisting wire and coming up with ideas (always the best part!!).  Ryan is going to help with the bigger pieces and the mechanical stuff (power tools!) I don't like handling.

I thought I'd share with you some of our progress and experiments.

First is the gathering stage.  I get some help with this from my dogs.
Play fetch first??  

Yippee!  We get to go on a walk!!  



My 'live edge' wood source, Amish neighbor. 

 Railroad ties, clay tiles

More clay drainage tiles.
 Exploring dog. 


 Some sort of cultivator or cart.  I may try to dig this up.  


Lots of wood... forgot to take photos of the buildings.  Some or just reduced to scrap wood piles now. 


Bringing my 'live edge' wood home.  
Next time I will use the tractor or wheelbarrow.  I also brought carpenter ants home.  Not welcome!! 


 Picking out some smaller 'live edge' wood pieces to experiment with. 
I used the sander and may try some more wood burning on the smaller pieces. 
 My first try at wood burning.  Of course, it is a horse. 

Some small pieces I liked.  So did my puppy.  She chewed the top piece.  When, oh when does the chewing stage end??  Yes, she has a zillion appropriate things to chew.  She is a lightening fast and sneaky 'retriever' of anything chewy. 


This piece immediately caught my eye because of the insect tunnels.  I did use the air compressor to blow out any undesirables.  We used some resin to experiment with filling in the tunnels.  The top surface would be sanded and stained after this step but I really, really like the look.  It may not look like much in the photo but believe me- it has potential.  We used a touch of food coloring for a transparent blue tint.  Loved it!! 


This is an old, weathered barn wood piece with barn roof slate pieces.  I believe I will write 'R-I-D-E' on this one, varnish, add some eye screws and wire for hanging.  

welcome sign, repurposed, vintage, home decor, shabby chic, rustic

 This is a bit further along so you can see the lettering and slate.  This is a 'live edge' welcome sign- still needs sanded and stained and wire for hanging.  
weathered barn boards sign
 More weathered barn wood siding for a sign of some kind.  

repurposed barbed wire, slate, barn wood
 I found a coil of rusted barbed wire.  So excited!!  One, I found it before my horses' feet did.  I sometimes ride in the less cluttered areas of this land.  Two, it will be fun using it for something.  It looks perfect for a wreath with just a couple more odds and ends but we will see. 
weathered barn siding, barn roof slate, rustic, repurposed

 Here's one of my 'workspaces'.  
I like photographing the finished creations against the peeling paint of my picnic table.  
Who would of thought peeling paint could look good? 


repurposed barn siding wood, barbed wire wreath
 See how good this photo looks?  
Why?  I am not sure.  Texture, color, and the whole repurposed, rustic, shabby chic theme I guess. 

repurposed barn slate
Finished slate, wire and horseshoe pieces.  The wire here is not repurposed.  

repurposed barn siding wood

Another wire piece display-- the wood is nice to use in photos.  

We are thinking of a name for our joint venture but for now I have some smaller pieces at my Etsy shop where I sell my art.   It is very likely anything I do will always have a barn, farm, animal, horse, cowgirl :) theme.  My son's interests don't go in that direction - he likes the furniture and construction aspect which is great.  I believe we can dovetail things nicely.   It will be fun working with him on this project.  He is in school for mechanical engineering.  How did I have a child (two actually- my other son is graduating in a couple weeks with a degree in Biochemistry) who are good at math?  A mystery to me but maybe credit for that goes to my husband.  I did my best to speak of the importance of math as I tried to hide my math phobia to my kids.  :) 

Happy Trails, as always!  Thank you for following along.  

Sue Steiner of Free Rein Art Studio 

Equine and Animal Artist, Pet Portraits